My internship at FIU Humanities Edge

This story was published in FIU News by Yenisleidy Simon Mengana.

Name: Anaridia Ramona Molina

Hometown: Santo Domingo, New York and Miami

What is your major? B.A. in English LiteratureCertificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Certificate in Women’s and Gender StudiesGlobal Learning Medallion

Where did you intern? During my Humanities Edge internship, I had the privilege of working with Rita Cauce, head of the Cataloging Department at FIU Libraries.

What was your title? Humanities Edge intern.

How did you get your internship? The Humanities Edge is an academic and professional development program that supports transfer students with an interest in pursuing a career in the humanities. Through this partnership between FIU and Miami Dade College, FIU students in the humanities have access to a number of resources including internships. I found out about my internship through this program. I submitted my cover letter and resume. Then, I had an interview, as well.

What did you do there? I supported Rita Cauce’s work in creating an online guide on Southeast Florida’s cultural institutions.

What projects did you work on? The first week of the internship established the groundwork that I needed to begin writing the content and scope for the county’s organizations in the upcoming weeks. I familiarized myself with the website, read the blogs and began annotating. This in-depth search was vital because it provided me with a comprehensive understanding of Florida’s cultural institutions. The following five weeks of the internship consisted of research, reading and gathering the list of data for Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm-Beach counties. The remaining four weeks of the internship, I devoted my time in preparing to write the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars blog, which promotes the creative writing and crucial work by and about Caribbean women.

How does your internship connect back to your coursework? My venture into the framework of research made me adept with the essentials of research; it granted me the opportunity to assert and enhance my critical sensibilities.

What was the coolest thing about your internship? What did you enjoy most about your experience? The project necessitated the investigation of local history and cultural institutions for the website. This internship not only provided me with intellectual satisfaction and research experience but facilitated and supported my work with the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars (ACWWS).

What did you learned about yourself? I learned that having a plan is beneficial for tackling many things at once. I am a person that works better if I do not leave work for the last minute. I was doing this internship while applying for graduate school and enrolled as a full-time student as well.

What advice do you have for those beginning the internship process? My recommendation for students is to apply to all the internship opportunities that you feel will benefit your professional career and intellectual satisfaction. Even if you do not feel qualified or like you don’t have enough time to do the internship, you will not regret adding this experience to your resume/cv along the road.

How has the position increased your professional confidence? This internship experience has helped me advance as a scholar. It made me adept with the essentials of research and awarded me hands-on experience. It also showed me the ins and outs of research endeavors, a fundamental necessity to the understanding and betterment of any field of study.

How has the internship expanded your professional network? Thanks to this internship, I added this experience to my cv, which I would argue enhanced my application and is perhaps one of the reasons why I have received acceptance letters to multiple English Ph.D. programs, including New York University, The University of Michigan – Ann Arbor, University of California – San Diego, and  others. Now, as I am about to transition from undergraduate to graduate work, I feel confident to be in the same room with other students who have had research experience. I feel prepared to embark on a journey to become a college professor one day.

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